CAN CUTTING DOWN TREES HELP PREVENT CLIMATE CHANGE?

Climate change prevention has become a global priority as leading scientist warn we only have 12-years to limit the catastrophe.

With increased efforts to turn things around and a cry to plant more trees and crack down on illegal logging. It got us thinking about what the woodworking industry could do to help combat climate change.

Although this sounds contradictory, if managed correctly, cutting down trees could prove to be a key-solution in tackling carbon emissions.

Cutting down trees might seem antithetical, but this theory has been back up by the Forrest Commission who sate. ‘If harvested during optimum growth-cycle and new trees are planted or allowed to regenerate, this could keep the forest as a net “sink” of carbon.

Carbon absorption from trees

Studies found that when new trees are growing they absorb more carbon dioxide at a faster rate, to aid growth. As the tree matures, this rapid rate of absorption will dramatically start to slow and level out. This indicates that if the carbon cycle of a tree is monitored carefully, and trees are cut down and replanted at the right time, we could actually increase the absorption of carbon dioxide.

Although this is not a fool proof plan as there are understandably concerns as to how this will affect wildlife and habitats, but it’s certainly food for thought, and presents a feasible solution for change

The-growth-cycle-of-trees

We hope you enjoyed reading this article, and why not let us know your thoughts on that matter.

DAY IN THE LIFE OF A JOINERY APPRENTICE

Steve Plumb joined Falkus Joinery in early 2017 as a joinery apprentice. In that time, as well as juggling his studies at The Building Crafts College (level 2 in bench joinery) and his work commitments, he has proved to be a vital member of the team and has already begun to climb the ranks, and was recently promoted to Junior Joiner.

Having previously worked as a display artist, he made the decision to up skill and change career. Keen to understand his draw to the industry, we caught up with Steve to pick his brain.   

How did you first get into joinery?

My first joinery experience was in my early 20’s whilst working as a Display Artist for Urban Outfitters, building POS fixtures and window displays. The actual joinery was very basic compared to what I do now, but it definitely helped develop my work ethic and appreciation for working with wood.

Describe an average day in the workshop

Each day is different. As an apprentice, I’m often working/assisting on several jobs at once so the main focus of each day is working out how best to divide my time so that I can work as efficiently as possible. That being said, sometimes big projects can mean that you spend the whole day in the shed ripping large quantities of timber down to size, but luckily most days are far more varied than that! I love the pace of working in the City and it’s great to have a big jobs list all ticked off at the end of the day.

What the best part of your job?

Working with my hands (and brain!). With joinery, I find it easy to become completely absorbed in whatever I’m doing. It’s such a satisfying and creative way to spend time.

What’s the worst part of your job?

Early mornings and the constant noise of the workshop.

What could the industry do to encourage more women to get into joinery and construction?

I think the actual industry is far more diverse than many people realise, it just has a bit of an image problem. There are plenty of women already working in construction, admittedly there could be more, but the industry needs to celebrate them more and perhaps make more of an effort to reach out women and girls in education who are looking for career inspiration.

What do you think the future holds for joinery – do you think this will be 100% machine based in the future?

I don’t think fine joinery can ever be completely machine based. A big part of job is learning to understand the natural properties of wood and using this knowledge to influence how you work with it. A machine would struggle to match grains, choose the most ascetically pleasing face on a board or even select the best timber for the job.

It’s hard to say what the future holds, but with the high demand for construction and development in the City, I think it’s safe to say that joinery’s here to stay.     

What advice would you give to individuals who are trying to break into the industry?

Do all that you can just to get your foot in the door, even if that means starting out from the very bottom. If you are willing to listen, work hard and learn then you can progress very quickly. Even if you have no experience, companies always value people who are reliable and willing to work.

We hope you enjoyed reading Steve’s story, and if you’re keen to find out more about our joinery apprenticeship scheme just get in touch.  

Although his career has only just begun with us, we predict a bright future for this ambitious joiner.

14 OF THE MOST COMMONLY USED TIMBERS FOR PRODUCTION

There are 60,065 species of tree in the world. However, only a fraction of this is used for production. 

Discover the most commonly used timbers and their properties with our handy downloadable infographic

SOFTWOOD 

Redwood (pine) 

This yellowish-white sapwood and reddish heartwood is one of the most widely used timers in joinery and is suitable for all types of interiors and exteriors.

Redwood-Pine
Whitewood

Whitewood (spruce)

This yellowish-white sapwood and reddish heartwood is one of the most widely used timers in joinery and is suitable for all types of interiors and exteriors including flooring, structural use and cladding. 

Southern yellow pine

This striking timber is a dense wood that has a reddish brown huge and distinctive grain it is great for heavy structural use and and is perfect for window boards,stair stringers and decking. 

Yellow-pine
Hemlock

Hemlock 

Hailing from N. America this fine textured timber is pale with a pinkish-brown colour. It’s malleable qualities makes it a good wood to work with and is therefore used for moldings, stair parts, kitchens, bedrooms and shopfitting.

Douglas Fir

From N. America is clear, this straw coloured and moderately durable softwood is best for both internal and external use including flooring and and structural use. 

Douglas Fir
Western Red Cedar

Western Red Cedar

This highly durable, N American timber can be used internally and externally without preservative treatment. It is widely used for cladding

HARDWOOD

American Ash

Is a light-coloured grey/brown hardwood with a course texture. Due to it’s lack of durability this timber is best used for internal for things such as handles.

American-Ash
Beech-tree

Beech

This creamy timber has excellent blending properties and turns a reddish-brown colour when steamed. Do its qualities it’s most commonly used for making furniture. 

European Oak

 Is a course yellow/brown wood with good durability. It has medium movement and is susceptible to iron staining. Used for cladding, flooring and decking.

European-Oak
American-White-Oak

American White Oak

This tight-grained hardwood comes in range of shade from a pale straw-to-pale red. Due to the strength  of the timber it is often used flooring, decking and heavy structural work. 

American Tulipwood

Slightly durable making it perfect for furniture and decorative joinery. It’s yellow/brown colouring and fine texture makes it perfect for interiors. 

American-Tulipwood
Sapele-Tree

Sapele

This tropical hardwood from West Africa, has a pink to red colour, with medium texture and movement. It is however difficult to treat but is used both internally and externally.

Dark Red Meranti

A Malaysia, red, tropical hardwood, is often used for furniture making due to its attractive colouring and medium texture.

Red-Wood
Iroko

Iroko

Is a West African, light-brown hardwood that is highly durable, making it suitable for external as well as internal use and sometimes used as a teak substitute.

CELEBRATING 60 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE

This January marks Falkus Joinery’s 60th Anniversary as joinery manufacturers and industry leaders. Established by the Jerram brothers in 1957, the duo set up shop in Shoreditch and built a lasting legacy. This family run business has grown from strength-to-strength and to this day remains at the fore front of joinery innovation.    

The London joinery has stood the test of time and we believe that’s due to the workshops unwavering passion for joinery. Our fierce investment in people has developed a strong family culture and a dedication to responsible purchasing has safeguarded sustainability. This careful consideration leaves us feeling confident that we’ll continue to uphold this long-standing trade and thrive.

Today, Falkus Joinery works across a wide range of joinery sectors, and specialises in: 

  • Bespoke kitchens
  • kitchen cabinets and doors 
  • Skirting 
  •  Bathroom joinery 
  • Vanity units 
  • Commercial office fit-outs 
  • Bleachers 
  • Custom made staircases 
  • Handmade furniture 
  • joinery fittings 
  • Bespoke doors 
  • Sash windows 
  •  Staircase manufacture and instillation 
  • Custom made reception desks 
  • Wall paneling 
  • Bespoke wardrobes 
  • Office furniture 
  • And everything else in between 

A brief history of Falkus Joinery

Founded by the Falkus family as an independent joinery manufacturer, the company prospered and were therefore looking to expand. When meeting with the Jerram’s it was agreed that it would be mutually beneficial to merge companies and expand their collective business offerings.

For both companies a successful partnership ensued over the decades which has allowed the collective to thrive and expand into new sectors. Today the Jerram Group is comprised of four divisions: Jerram Falkus Construction, Falkus Joinery, Jerram Development and Jerram Falkus. As a croup we’ll continue to develop with the times and provide high-end construction and joinery service to the UK.  

Take a journey through the decades and discover our combined history with the Jerram Group. We hope that you find this just as interesting as we did.

Falkus-Joinery-timeline

The future

Looking back it’s clear to see that we’ve come a long way and we’re thrilled to see that traditional joinery is a trade that continues to flourish in this increasingly digital age.

It’s difficult to see what the future has in store for our joinery manufacturer but we look forward to what may come and to celebrating the next 60!